Screaming for dialog? Public Social Media Policy

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@JennHoffman

@JennHoffman Banned for tweeting

Banned for tweeting

UPDATE: Jenn will be our special guest on Social Media Edge on Tuesday, May 24 so be sure to tune in live where all the fun happens!

No running. No smoking. No standing. No shirt, no shoes, no service. No skateboarding on sidewalk. No Tweeting?

In case you missed it actress Jenn Hoffman was banned from the Chateau Marmont for tweeting. But really was it “that” she was tweeting or “what” she was tweeting. And if it was “what” where is the line?

2 thoughts on “Screaming for dialog? Public Social Media Policy

  1. If private businesses want to ban Tweeting/photos/videos in their facilities, they should be able to.

    Chateau Marmont is known for being a celebrity hot-spot. If somebody is tweeting about goings-on or taking photos, it may deter the celebrities from coming. Celebrity dollars won’t be spent, nor will the dollars of the people that come to see celebrities. The venue is protecting its business.

    Sure, folks can tweet about whatever they want, but I hope they don’t think they can tweet without social ramifications. Now when those ramifications become legal, there’s a problem.

    1. And I agree with private policy about social media. What do you think about the Social Media Policy for private venues – how should that be posted? Further should a private venue ban people for violating an undisclosed policy? May that also have ramifications?

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